HOODOO CANYON

HOODOO CANYON 
This is a short dayhike or overnighter through a lightly used and surprisingly lush area of the Colville National Forest.

Difficulty: A1
Elevation gain: 880 ft.
Key elevations: High point 3,720 ft., Emerald Lake 3,200′
Distance: 5 miles round trip
Time: 3-5 hours or overnight
Season: May through October
Map: USGS Jackknife

Drive:
From Canada 1. Cross the border at Waneta, south of Trail and Montrose and take the Northport Boundary Road to meet Highway 25 at Northport or 2. Cross the border at Paterson, south of Rossland and drive south to Northport then SW to turn west (right) onto State Highway 20 just before it crosses the Columbia west of Kettle Falls or 3. Cross at Cascade/Laurier south of Christina Lake, BC and drive south down 395 and turn west (right) onto Forest Road 460 (Deadman Creek).
From Kettle Falls, WA. Drive west on State Highway 20 across the Columbia River and turn right onto State Highway 395 toward Canada and drive about 6 miles to FR 460.
0.0. Turn west (left) onto Forest Road 460 (Deadman Creek).
6 miles. Turn left onto Forest Road 9565.
9 miles. Parking area and TH on left side of road.

Map image

Trail/Route: Hoodoo Canyon Trail #17 descends to a footbridge over Deadman Creek and climbs through timber and wildflowers for 2 miles. Out of the trees, set a view of Lily Lake, 500 feet below. The trail skirts the edge of the narrow canyon with its many rock outcroppings, then descends steeply down sharp switchbacks the last ¼ mile to Emerald Lake at 3,200 ft.
Emerald Lake is 10-15 ft. deep in early spring, but dwindles to a small pond by late summer. There is room for many campsites.
The trail ends here, but the canyon and stream run another ¾ mile SE into larger Trout Lake, which has an improved Forest Service campground. The Forest Service built a shorter trail connecting Hoodoo Canyon with Trout Lake in the early 90s.

About admin

I would like to think of myself as a full time traveler. I have been retired since 2006 and in that time have traveled every winter for four to seven months. The months that I am “home”, are often also spent on the road, hiking or kayaking.
I hope to present a website that describes my travel along with my hiking and sea kayaking experiences.

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